First Boat Day of the Season

Despite all of the temptation to buy a boat, we’ve decided to spend another summer season renting one. (It is significantly less expensive to rent a boat every few weekends throughout the summer than it is to own a boat year-round.) We live in a spectacular place – where lakes and rivers weave around mountains. The first boat day of 2020 was glorious, and we had the added bonus of having my parents join us during the last couple of hours.

Weather-wise, it was perfectly comfortable. We got on the water by 10 a.m., a smart move considering how busy it was by the end of the day. We fished a little, put our feet up, and enjoyed the breeze.

Jackson is not a fisherman, but he loves a good nap. The rocking of a boat and the sound of water lapping on the shore is the perfect white noise for our boat lounger.

Jackson attempted to swim, and it didn’t matter that we warned him the water would be cold. He jumped in to see for himself and promptly climbed right back out. Jeremy remembered how cold it was swimming in the Mediterranean Sea last May, so he didn’t even risk it.

We picked up my parents a little before 4 p.m., which gave us a couple of hours to ride them around and find a cove where Dad could fish. He’s been itching to fish, and frankly, we weren’t sure how he’d manage to cast a line and reel it in post-stroke. While there is still a cardiac sarcoma to tend to, the stroke is proving to be the daily struggle for him.

With a little help, he managed better than we expected. The secret was to help him keep the lines untangled and then stay out of his way!

The first boat day of the season was successful, and it was a welcome break from the monotony of staying home during our “Safer At Home” orders. Even though restrictions are lifting and the temptation to travel domestically is strong (Destin, we miss you), we’re staying home this summer and renting boats. Our plans to travel internationally were thwarted by COVID-19, so we’re staying home and seeing what transpires next year.

Also, this is our last week of school, praise God. As a rule, I aim to finish the school year by Mother’s Day as a gift to myself. The boys have tests to take, I have dozens of papers and tests to grade, and then I have to turn everything into the co-op and our umbrella school.

But then, as God as my witness, it’s going to be summer, and I’m going to take a long, hard break.

Which means by June I’ll be planning next year’s syllabus because I can’t help myself.

How is it February?

I don’t even know where to begin.

My father had a stroke on Dec. 8 while on a business trip to California. On Dec. 12, he underwent open-heart surgery to remove the tumor that caused the stroke and also to undergo a double bypass. My mom flew to Santa Clara to be with him, and they ended up staying in California for nearly two full months. While there are plenty of things to be grateful for (financially, medically, and otherwise), it has been a long, hard road since this whole mess first started.

Finally, thankfully, Dad was approved to fly home to East Tennessee in the last week of January. Unable to fly commercial, they were afforded a leer jet for medical transport, followed by an ambulance ride from the airport to the rehab center where he’s been since. My sister booked a flight from Chicago, and we were all together in one room – finally – by the beginning of February.

It is unreal, honestly. The stroke is making everything difficult, as one would imagine. How does one focus on treating cancer when basic activities, such as walking, are so hard to accomplish?

Again, we are grateful for small yet significant mercies – Dad’s swift progress, his stubborn resolve, personable and knowledgeable healthcare providers. He is a determined man, and we’ve been placed in good hands. Still, we are anxious to move even more quickly, eager to get started on treating this damn tumor that no one saw coming.

As one does, I’ve spent a lot of time remembering fun memories from my childhood and looking at photos of my parents when they were first sweethearts. I have pictures taped to the lamp on my desk so I can easily be reminded of how good things have been.

In between the moments of frustration and desperation, we’ve been able to laugh and enjoy being together. It’s so easy to get stuck in sadness! It’s too easy to slip into a dark place and dwell on the things that scare me. So, when the laughter comes, it feels like a release. Plus, everything is funnier in sleep-deprived delirium.

It’s been especially nice to have more Treadways around to share stories, laugh, and help carry the weight of our burdens and decisions.

In between these moments and trips to the rehab center, our life is trudging along at a steady pace. The boys are keeping up with school, I’m teaching at the co-op and putting out a monthly magazine, and Chuck’s work schedule is as steady as usual.

Fortunately, I was afforded a surprise Girls Weekend prior to my parents flying home. Oh, how I needed those two days! We stayed in a cabin in Townsend and did precious little, only getting out of our pajamas exactly one time to grab a quick meal.

In the quieter moments of my day, I retreat to the bedroom. More now than ever I need to cut out the extra noise and distraction (in true INFJ fashion). Salem, per usual, is my constant companion. I don’t know how you non-animal people cope. If I could slap a therapy vest on this cat and carry him around with me, I totally would.

A Full Moon in December

It has been a full week fraught with surprise, worry, and anticipation. We are near the end of our fall semester, which means tests and papers and sorting grades, and then I came down with an upper respiratory infection suddenly. (It’s not the flu, praise God. I got tested.)

And then my father had a medical emergency on the other side of the country, followed by a midnight trip to the emergency vet for Salem just last night.

So much came at us at once, and every day since Saturday has felt too heavy to carry. I’m low on sleep, so I’m pacing myself.

Then I saw the moon, and it was so bright that it lit up the entire neighborhood. For the first time in a long while, I grabbed my camera, full of inspiration. (I’ve missed that feeling, that pull to take photos and capture something in the moment. Honestly, it’s been a long time.)

Photographing the moon is tricky. You cannot rely on auto settings or a tripod. You have to know exactly how to account for distance, darkness, and the high contrast of a bright moon.

Using the Nikkor 55-200 mm lens, I set my Nikon 5300: ISO 100, shutter speed 1/125th, aperture f/8. Then I dug my elbows into my sides and snapped.

Full moon on Dec. 11, 2019, 8 p.m. EST. Nikon 5300/Nikkor 55-200 mm. Setting: ISO 100, shutter speed 1/125th, aperture f/8

It could be clearer, and, truthfully, I wish I’d captured it earlier in the night when it appeared even bigger. But, it is was it is, and I am pleased.

With Advent underway, I can’t help but feel extra pensive. More than usual, even! This is a season of waiting, but after this week, I feel like I’ve waited beyond my portion – waiting for phone calls, waiting for updates, waiting for doctors to finally work their way around to me, to my dad, to Salem.

Mercifully, this moon made me stop and take a breath. It pushed pause on my list of worries. It reminded me that there is much more going on in the world than I am privy to and still, I am not forgotten.

How Christmas is 13 days away, I cannot understand. I swear it was just Halloween. More than ever, I need to unburden our schedule and intentionally slow down. This moon was just what I needed to remind me that time doesn’t have to go by so quickly.

A Sunday afternoon of horseback riding

Last week, on the first full day with my parents, we went horseback riding. As a family we’d only been once beforehand, and Jackson did not ride his own horse. This time around, we let him have a go at riding on his own and did a great job balancing on the saddle. (Balancing and coordination are not his best skill sets!) He kept tethered to the lead horse and did a great job all around.

Jackson and TAT

Of course my animal-loving son was loving every minute.

Jeremy and his horse

A horse’s eyelashes are the most beautiful:

Equine eyelashes

Look into my camera

Petting Jeremy's horse

Chuck on his horse

Walking in a line

Riding through the creek was the best:

Through the river

We rode for an hour, which was just enough for these inexperienced bodies. The weather was perfect and the horses were precious. Such a great way to start our vacation 

Horseback riding in Philly

Summer Road Trip 2016

We got home last night from what felt like a long and short family vacation. Long in the car, short with the family. The usual.

Sunset on Friday June 24

This is how it is when you don’t live near family, or when any of your family members live near each other. My side is sprinkled across the country, primarily on the east coast, but still. Seeing my people includes long-distance travel almost every time.

But it’s worth it, you know?

Me and Mom at Hershey Park

Most of our time was spent in Philadelphia with my parents. We went horseback riding, spent an evening at Hershey Park, and Chuck and I were able to spend a whole day alone. We wandered around not knowing what to do with ourselves!

Date night in Philly

We’re home now, happy to be reunited with our home and beds and space. I missed my pets, missed my routine, and missed eating my own home-cooked meals. Vacation is always fun, but so is coming home.

Nearly home from family vacation

These are just a few photos from my phone. Sit tight for the ones from my camera. They are fabulous.

Happy 38th Anniversary!

This photo first appeared in one of their college yearbooks. It has since been photocopied and passed around the family. I adore it.

Happy Anniversary, Mom and Dad!